About The Team Coaching Zone Explore the art and science of team coaching in organizations! Take your team coaching practice to the next level through the Zone’s podcast, blog, webinars, resources, discussions and more! This site is for new and experienced team coaches, for professionals in the areas of Human Resources and Learning & Development, and for leaders and managers in organizations.

oie_xlsmthdlpqea

Team Coaching – “…is an interactive process through which a team coach both supports as well as challenges a team to accelerate its development and performance over a given period of time (e.g. 4 to 12 months).  Team coaching can be leveraged to increase results, to enhance employee engagement, to drive organizational change, to foster the development of leadership cultures, and more.” – Krister Lowe, PhD, Host of the Team Coaching Zone Podcast

Podcast Downloads

Countries Tuning In

Newsletter Subscribers

LinkedIn Group Members

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED TCZ PODCAST!

Why do some team coaching engagements seem to get traction and create magic while others peter out and fail to produce results? Tune in to this week’s episode of The Team Coaching Zone Podcast with Host Dr. Krister Lowe and special guest Dr. Richard Boyatzis to discover the answer to this important question.

Dr. Richard Boyatzis is the H.R. Horvitz Professor of Family Business, a Professor of Organizational Behavior and a Distinguished University University Professor at Case Western Reserve University. Using his well-established Intentional Change Theory (ICT) and complexity theory, Richard Boyatzis, PhD, has continued to research how people and organizations engage in sustainable, desired change. The theory predicts how changes occur in different groups of human organizations, including team, community, country and global change. Ongoing research supporting this theory includes developing new and better measures of an individual’s emotional, social and cognitive intelligence as well as studies that demonstrate the relationship between these abilities and performance. His latest research includes fMRI studies to establish neuro-endocrine arousal of coaching to the Positive Emotional Attractor and resonant leadership.

In this episode, laden with “value bombs,” Dr. Boyatzis outlines his more than 50 year journey in the area of coaching and how this led to his seminal work on Intentional Change Theory. Some of the themes covered in the episode include: why training fails to create change; what is required for coaching to be effective at create sustainable change in individuals, teams and systems; the role of purpose, learning, emotion, strengths and relationships in the change process; why team coaching engagements get or don’t get traction; what coaches should focus on in a coaching session; the 5 discoveries of ICT; the positive and negative emotional attractor and how the balance drives or inhibits change; peer coaching as the main form of learning and team coaching in the future and more.

Dr. Boyatzis also shares a rich list of resources where listeners can further their learning on his important work. This is truly an episode that team coaches will listen to repeatedly and is chock full of wisdom and insights that will take your team coaching practice to the next level.

Listen Now

Play

SHOW NOTES

itunes-podcast-300x110

oie_FHDKkMxcjd4O

oie_wLWK44Dk98d5

oie_P2hcJxBfeWEd

FEATURED RESOURCE

On this week’s episode of the Team Coaching Zone Podcast, guest Dr. Richard Boyatzis mentions his book Primal Leadership: Unleashing the Power of Emotional Intelligence

About the Book

Managers and professionals across the globe have embraced Primal Leadership, affirming the importance of emotionally intelligent leadership. Its influence has also reached well beyond the business world: the book and its ideas are now used routinely in universities, business and medical schools, and professional training programs, and by a growing legion of professional coaches.

This refreshed edition, with a new preface by the authors, vividly illustrates the power—and the necessity—of leadership that is self-aware, empathic, motivating, and collaborative in a world that is ever more economically volatile and technologically complex. It is even timelier now than when it was originally published.

From bestselling authors Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee, this groundbreaking book remains a must-read for anyone who leads or aspires to lead.“Peacebuilding” Defined:

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Business leaders who maintain that emotions are best kept out of the work environment do so at their organization’s peril. Bestselling author Daniel Goleman’s theories on emotional intelligence (EI) have radically altered common understanding of what “being smart” entails, and in Primal Leadership, he and his coauthors present the case for cultivating emotionally intelligent leaders. Since the actions of the leader apparently account for up to 70 percent of employees’ perception of the climate of their organization, Goleman and his team emphasize the importance of developing what they term “resonant leadership.” Focusing on the four domains of emotional intelligence–self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management–they explore what contributes to and detracts from resonant leadership, and how the development of these four EI competencies spawns different leadership styles. The best leaders maintain a style repertoire, switching easily between “visionary,” “coaching,” “affiliative,” and “democratic,” and making rare use of less effective “pace-setting” and “commanding” styles. The authors’ discussion of these methods is informed by research on the workplace climates engendered by the leadership styles of more than 3,870 executives. Indeed, the experiences of leaders in a wide range of work environments lend real-life examples to much of the advice Goleman et al. offer, from developing the motivation to change and creating an improvement plan based on learning rather than performance outcomes, to experimenting with new behaviors and nurturing supportive relationships that encourage change and growth. The book’s final section takes the personal process of developing resonant leadership and applies it to the entire organizational culture. –S. Ketchum –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Publishers Weekly Review

“The fundamental task of leaders… is to prime good feeling in those they lead. That occurs when a leader creates resonance a reservoir of positivity that unleashes the best in people. At its root, then, the primal job of leadership is emotional.” So argue Goleman (Emotional Intelligence) and EI (emotional intelligence) experts Boyatzis and McKee. They use the word “primal” not only in its original sense, but also to stress that making employees feel good (i.e., inspired and empowered) is the job a leader should do first. To prove that the need to lead and to respond to leadership is innate, the authors cite numerous biological studies of how people learn and react to situations (e.g., an executive’s use of innate self-awareness helps her to be open to criticism). And to demonstrate the importance of emotion to leadership, they note countless examples of different types of leaders in similar situations, and point out that the ones who get their employees emotionally engaged accomplish far more. Perhaps most intriguing is the brief appendix, where the authors compare the importance of IQ and EI in determining a leader’s effectiveness. Their conclusion that EI is more important isn’t surprising, but their reasoning is. Since one has to be fairly smart to be a senior manager, IQ among top managers doesn’t vary widely. However, EI does. Thus, the authors argue, those managers with higher EI will be more successful. (Mar. 11)Forecast: Goleman already has a legion of fans from his early books on EI. His publisher is banking on his fame; the house has planned a $250,000 campaign and a 100,000 first

Team Coaching Resources (Part 1): Five Team-Level Assessments

by Krister Lowe, PhD

20430170 - feedback

Since launching The Team Coaching Zone Podcast-an interview show that explores the art & science of coaching teams in organizations–back in January of 2015, I’ve interviewed some great pioneers, thought leaders and practitioners in the field.  The insights that I have gleaned from the interviews have transformed my approach to team coaching as well as my business. When listeners of the show reach out to me I’m often asked for recommendations on team coaching resources.  Specifically they revolve around three themes:

  • What team coaching assessments are available?
  • What are some of the main books on team coaching?
  • What team coach training programs should I consider exploring?

Recently a listener suggested that I pull together a consumer reports type episode or blog post series to review some of the resources that I’ve come across.  So voila here we go with the first in a 3-part blog post series on Team Coaching Resources! Read more…

Team Coaching Resources (Part 2): Five Books on Team Coaching

by Krister Lowe, PhD

BookImage

My relationship with books has resembled a tumultuous love affair.  Utterly enraptured one moment only to be followed by a crash and burn falling out the next.  In college I majored in English Literature.  The crushing number of books I had to read beat the love for reading out of me by the time I graduated.  While pursuing my Master’s Degree in Social-Organizational Psychology some 6 years later I had recovered and rediscovered my passion for books.  But this time they were more practical and scientific and revolved around themes such as leadership, teams, conflict resolution, organization change, and the like.  By the time I was waist-deep into my doctoral training (also in Social-Organizational Psychology) a few years later, books had been replaced with an explosion of articles that distilled the latest insights from theory, research and practice down into 10 to 20 pages for rapid and mass consumption. And so now after a long drought (and a second recovery!) I’m back to reading books but this time they tend to revolve around the specific theme of team coaching.

In this second in a three-part article series on Team Coaching Resources, I’m going to be providing a brief overview of 5 books that I recommend on the topic of coaching teams in organizations.  Read more…

 

Team Coaching Resources (Part 3): Five Books Team Coach Training Programs

by Krister Lowe, PhD

51928325 - chrysalis butterfly hanging on a leaf .

This the final installment of a three part round-up series on team coaching resources. In Part 1 we looked at 5 team-level assessments geared towards team coaching. In Part 2 we looked at 5 books on team coaching. In this post, Part 3, we are going to be looking at 5 team coach training programs. You can also listen to podcast episodes covering similar content here on iTunes if you prefer the spoken vs. written word 🙂

I want to start off this post by making a few comments about training as a learning vehicle. This is a topic that I’m very familiar with. Two years ago I decided to niche down in one area—team coaching. But before that I was more of a generalist in Learning and Development. I was a consultant, a mediator, a facilitator and most of all a trainer. I spent more than 15 years running 100’s of training workshops all over the world on all kinds of topics: performance management, conflict resolution, leadership and management development, coaching for managers, diversity, ethics and more. Read more…

FOLLOW THE TEAM COACHING ZONE ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This
Stay in The Team Coaching Zone!

Stay in The Team Coaching Zone!

Join our mailing list to get weekly news & updates from The Team Coaching Zone!

You have Successfully Subscribed!